Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate by Stephanie Hollis PDF

By Stephanie Hollis

ISBN-10: 0585177600

ISBN-13: 9780585177601

ISBN-10: 0851153178

ISBN-13: 9780851153179

This examine of literature through clerics who have been writing to, for, or aboutAnglo-Saxon ladies within the eighth and early ninth centuries indicates thatthe place of ladies had already declined sharply sooner than the Conquest a declare at variance with the normal scholarly view. Stephanie Hollis argues that Pope Gregory's letter to Augustine and Theodore's Penitentialimplicitly exhibit the early church's view of ladies as subordinate to males, and keeps that a lot early church writing displays conceptions of womanhood that had hardened into demonstrated standard by way of the later center a long time. To aid her argument the writer examines the indigenous place of ladies sooner than the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity, and considers purposes for the early church's concessions in recognize of girls. Emblematic of advancements within the conversion interval, the institution and eventual suppression of abbess-ruled double monasteries types a different concentration of this research. STEPHANIE HOLLIS is Senior Lecturer in Early English, Universityof Auckland, New Zealand.

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Extra resources for Anglo-Saxon Women and the Church: Sharing a Common Fate

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Olsen (Bloomington, 1990), pp. 10036. , neither Hill nor Clover calculates the effects of child-bearing), seems more likely to have enhanced than to have diminished women's status, and legislation concerning the bride-price can be read as signifying that the bride-price was an index of women's social value, rather than their status as mere chattels. P. T. Rosenthal, Angles, Angels, and Conquerors: 4001154 (New York, 1973), because they ignore evidence of the power of royal women and monastic women's contribution to the growth of the church.

J. Clover, "The Politics of Scarcity: Notes on the Sex Ratio in Early Scandinavia," in New Readings on Women in Old English Literature, ed. H. H. Olsen (Bloomington, 1990), pp. 10036. , neither Hill nor Clover calculates the effects of child-bearing), seems more likely to have enhanced than to have diminished women's status, and legislation concerning the bride-price can be read as signifying that the bride-price was an index of women's social value, rather than their status as mere chattels. P.

Wright, Womankind in Western Europe (London, 1869); quoted C. , Women in Anglo-Saxon England and the Impact of 1066, paperback edn. (Oxford, 1986), p. 13. 2 L. Eckenstein, Women Under Monasticism (Cambridge, 1896), p. ix. Eckenstein, consistently, regarded the dissolution of the monasteries as having significantly increased the subjection of women by depriving them of their only non-domestic sphere of activity, but she is among those who see a sharp decline in English women's prestige in the Anglo-Norman period; see esp.

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